President’s Letter

kelly_dennis10fa4a4a8f6bd683ab184ff000040cfadVolume 41, Issue 1 (Fall 2017)
By Joan Stringfellow

Howdy!

As I write to you all on this beautiful fall day, I must tell you how honored I am to serve as your president.  I will, hopefully, follow the good work that Laura McKinnon began and make everyone proud!  Thank you, Laura!

I begin with a huge thank you to the Local Arrangements Committee–Michelle Rigual, Marie Andrews, Keeta Hartnett, Jen Laws, Alexandria Siek, and Sherri Thomas–for another successful annual meeting.  While I was not able to attend this year, I heard a great time was had by all!  I also send a shout out to the Program Committee, Laura McKinnon, Cassie DuBay, Richard Guajardo, Joseph Lawson, Mike Martinez, Michelle Rigual, and Amanda Zerangue, for putting together a wide range of programming.  There was something for everyone, from a little bit of politics, a little bit of research, outreach, digital collections & repositories, to artificial intelligence.  The only problem might have been choosing which one to attend!  This, they say, is a good problem to have!

I hope that everyone has renewed their memberships! For a small investment, you really do get a wealth of opportunity to collaborate, network, and learn new things with other librarians in our region.  From the smallest library to the largest library, it is very affordable.  To renew your membership, please visit the Membership Page on the SWALL website.

Don’t forget to mark your calendars for our next annual meeting, which also happens to be our 60th, scheduled for April 5-7, 2018, in Houston, Texas!  The theme is “#Diversify.”  We look forward to your ideas, thoughts, and program submissions to make this a great meeting! If you have not done so already, please consider submitting a program proposal. It is truly a great way to share your unique knowledge with other librarians who can benefit from your experience. If you are new to presenting, we are supportive bunch, so don’t be shy!

I look forward to working with all of you this year!!  Please don’t hesitate to contact me at jstringfellow@law.tamu.edu if you have any questions or suggestions for something we could be doing differently.

Gig ’em!

Joan Stringfellow
Head of Technical & Electronic Services
Texas A&M University School of Law

 

Volume 41, Issue 1 (Fall 2017) Table of Contents

 

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Library Activism in a Post-Fact Era

Volume 41, Issue 1 (Fall 2017)
By Lynne S. Rhys

“How wonderful it is that nobody need wait a single moment
before starting to improve the world.”
–Anne Frank

As a new librarian working in an academic law library, I found myself wishing I had more freedom to speak my mind on political issues. I wanted to join the tenured professors and be part of the action, but I felt constrained by my position and my inexperience. I wanted to make a difference in my chosen profession, but I felt powerless to do so in the rather stodgy environment that was our law school. This desire to participate in civil discourse has never left me, but the current toxic political climate has given me a new sense of urgency. Luckily, I’ve discovered over the years that there are as many ways to be an activist as there are to be a librarian.

library activism.jpg

Lynne Rhys presenting on library activism at SWALL Annual Conference.

So just what is activism, anyway? Merriam Webster’s online dictionary defines it like this:

[A] doctrine or practice that emphasizes direct vigorous action especially in support of or opposition to one side of a controversial issue [, e.g.,]  political activism [or] environmental activism.

That’s all well and good, but it implies that one has to be controversial in order to be an activist. And for many librarians, controversy can be a risky career move in this age of diminished budgets, vanishing shelf space, and free online resources. Controversy is important and necessary at the right time and place, but many of us are not in a position to create it in the arena of our jobs.

I endorse a broader definition: Activism is simply taking action to make the world a better place. If you’re doing your job, you’re already an activist, even if you’re just helping a law student learn research skills, providing forms to a pro se client, or helping an attorney determine the reputability of a source. You’re planting seeds of change that will sprout in ways you may never know, and it is quite possible to sow those seeds even on the job.

Remember:

  • Activism does not require partisanship
  • Activism does not necessarily take sides
  • Activism is not limited to politics
  • Activism need not be liberal or conservative

But caution is still prudent, because there are significant limitations on the sorts of activism in which librarians can engage. It’s best to be well-informed about those before taking on an activist role. As librarians, we face three general types of limitations: ethical, legal, and organizational.

The first limitation is ethical. Librarians feel compelled to remain neutral. Now, it is true that as librarians, we shouldn’t censor the information we give to patrons based on our personal beliefs. But it is perfectly appropriate to evaluate the quality of the resources available. Indeed, in this volatile post-fact era, helping our patrons distinguish fact from fiction may be the most important thing we do. It is also appropriate to favor established organizational values such as inclusiveness and diversity.

The second limitation on activism is legal, especially for law librarians working in the public sector. For librarians who work for the federal government, or whose organizations receive federal funds, the Hatch Act, 5 U.S.C. § 7323, prohibits certain political activities on and off the job. There are likely to be similar state or local prohibitions as well. The website for the U.S. Office of Special Counsel provides guidance on the federal act. See U.S. Office of Special Counsel, Hatch Act, https://osc.gov/Pages/HatchAct-AdditionalResouces.aspx (last visited June 26, 2017). Happily, you’ll find a robust list of things you can do.

Finally, there are often limitations on activism imposed either formally or informally by your organization. This is especially true for corporations, firms, and other private entities. The scope of these limitations is defined by the mission, culture, and policies of the entity and its management.

Beyond such limitations, though, the scope of activism has no bounds. Let’s consider options for law firm librarians as an example. Your law firm is not likely to appreciate vocal opinions that conflict with a client’s interests or the managing partner’s personal views. But there may be other ways to effect change within the law firm environment. What is the firm’s pro bono policy? The firm may have ongoing projects in which the librarian can participate. Find out how your library can get involved. Consider also the scope of the firm’s other charitable work. For example, does the firm participate in projects for Habitat for Humanity? If so, join in! And what happens to your superceded volumes and other discards? Can they be donated to a nearby prison, and will the prison accept them?

It’s great if you can get your organization’s buy-in to participate actively in the community, but what if you can’t? Regardless of any limitations, the possibilities are so vast that anyone can find a form of activism that fits.

Let’s start by dividing activism into two general types that I’ll call political activism and “small” activism. Political activism targets the infrastructure of change. Small activism, on the other hand, is activism on a more intimate scale. You will probably have to participate in politics on your own time, but there are many ways to incorporate “small” activism into the workplace.

Starting with political activism, consider lobbying, or even running for office. If you’ve never lobbied before, sit in on city council meetings or state legislative hearings. Learn the mechanics of expressing your opinion. It’s a lot easier to appear before a committee if you’ve seen other people do it. Your political party or favorite charity may also have workshops on how to lobby effectively. You can also run for office. If that interests you, find mentorship organizations such as Emily’s List. Your local party officials can provide guidance. If lobbying and running for office seems like too much, then practice contacting your elected representatives by phone to register your views.

An important reminder about political activism: it is likely subject to significant legal and organizational obstacles. For example, as an employee of the New Mexico judiciary, I am permitted to run for public office, but if I am elected I must resign from my job in order to take the post.

If politics isn’t for you, how about small activism? Here are just a few ideas:

  • If you teach, think about hypotheticals on hot topics that can foster critical thinking skills. For example, develop a problem that involves climate change policy.
  • Organize a speaker series for your patrons.
  • Design and give a workshop on an appropriate topic such as protection of digital privacy.
  • Publish a newsletter or law review article.
  • Propose a session for the next SWALL, AALL, or ALA annual meeting.
  • Join a committee. There are plenty of opportunities in AALL, ALA, SWALL, and perhaps even in your own organization.
  • Incorporate activism into your collection development strategy. For example, if you work in a public law library, think about beefing up materials for non-lawyers. If you have a fiction collection, think about adding books that are used in political discourse, such as The Fountainhead, Brave New World, and The Handmaid’s Tale. Another approach: select a variety of books by provocative and thoughtful authors on selected issues. Or develop a balanced collection on an area of interest such as immigration.
  • Create a book display of your librarians’ “picks.”

If these ideas don’t strike your fancy, look to other libraries for inspiration. Some libraries, for example, have periodic “Food for Fines” campaigns in which patrons can pay off fines by donating nonperishable food items. These “fines” are then donated to a local food bank.  See, e.g., Nashville Public Library, Food for Fines, https://library.nashville.org/event/food-fines (last visited June 26, 2017). The Northern Onondaga Public Library in Cicero, New York, has taken the idea a step further, creating a sustainable community garden on library property. Northern Onondaga Public Library, What is the LibraryFarm?, http://www.nopl.org/services/spaces/library-farm/ (last visited June 26, 2017).

Whatever flavor of activism you choose, here are some strategies that will make your participation more effective:

  • Focus on just one or two issues at a time
  • Build a team and get buy-in from your organization, if you can
  • Educate yourself thoroughly to understand all sides of the issue
  • Get to know the stakeholders, and listen to them
  • Learn about the “infrastructure of change” – in other words, get to know the ins and outs of your political system
  • Establish well-developed goals and be willing to reevaluate
  • Develop a plan and act
  • Assess effectiveness, adjust, and move forward

The takeaway is this: No matter how restrictive your work environment, no matter how inexperienced you feel, and no matter how small your budget, you can make a difference. If you want to be an activist, then be an activist!

Lynne S. Rhys
State Law Librarian
New Mexico Supreme Court Law Library
Based on a presentation at the SWALL Annual Meeting, April 7, 2017

 

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SWALL 2017 Annual Meeting Wrap Up

Volume 41, Issue 1 (Fall 2017)

IgniteTalk2SWALL2017

Katy Badeaux presents her Ignite Talk.

By Michelle Rigual, SWALL 2017 Local Arrangements Committee Chair

Nearly sixty attendees and exhibitors gathered at the Sheraton Albuquerque Uptown in Albuquerque, New Mexico for the SWALL 2017 Annual Meeting, held April 6-8. The theme was Outreach and Access: No Half Measures. “Half Measures” and “Full Measure” were the titles of two infamous episodes from Breaking Bad, a popular TV series set in Albuquerque. Inspired by the theme, Breaking Bad imagery appeared on the meeting website, signage, and name tags, and attendees received baggies of the locally produced candy that served as blue meth on the show.

To limit expense and waste, there were no conference tote bags or printed programs. In their place, each person received only a drink tumbler for desert hydration and a single-page Quick Guide to events and their locations. Attendees quickly adapted; those seeking detailed information used the hotel’s wireless internet to access the meeting website.

The Meeting officially kicked off on Thursday with the Opening Lunch, sponsored by LexisNexis, and speaker Prof. Cliff Villa from University of New Mexico School of Law. Prof. Villa presented Is the Act of God Dead?, a thought provoking and moving discussion of the extent to which natural disasters can be anticipated and avoided. The presentation drew from a diversity of sources including Thomas Jefferson, Nietzsche, Shakespeare, and the Wizard of Oz. Afternoon programs included Guerilla Marketing, Oil and Gas Law Research, The Politics of Food in the Southwest, plus four Ignite Talks of just slightly over five minutes each on the Internet of Things, decluttering your library, county law library outreach and access, and the history of women in the U.S. military. Thursday’s events were capped off with an opportunity, sponsored by Thomson Reuters, for attendees to network and socialize in a relaxed environment with live Spanish guitar, complimentary drinks, and excellent hors d’oeuvres.

Friday’s schedule was chock-full. The day’s educational content started with a plenary session provided by New Mexico Supreme Court Law Library Director Lynne Rhys on the timely subject of Library Activism in a Post-Fact Era. After the plenary, programming split back into two tracks, one focused on topics of interest to academic librarians, the second more varied. Programs included You Can’t Write Without Research: Tips for Helping Students with Scholarly Research Papers; Research Assessment in Doctrinal ClassesSight, Sound and the Law: Common Issues in Audiovisual Production; Texas State Law Library’s Digital Collection: It is Remotely Possible!; and a two-part Deep Dive entitled Where’s My Free Lawyer? Legal Reference to the Pro Se Patron. The association business meeting was held just after lunch and time was set aside in the afternoon for committee meetings.

Reception2.JPG

The Reception at UNM Law Library

The final educational events of the day were two concurrent roundtables for government and academic law librarians. After a short break, attendees hopped a bus to the UNM Law Library for a reception featuring Latin fusion appetizers, local beers and wines, and the UNM Library staff proudly showing off the library’s many special features. Dine Arounds followed for those who had the willpower to not overindulge in duck taquitos at the reception.

Energy and attendance remained high on Saturday for a full morning of programming. Sessions included Introduction to Securities Law Research, UNM Law Librarians’ Fight for Law Faculty Status, Chapter Website Redesign: HALL Membership Services Move to the Cloud, The Future of Artificial Intelligence in Law Libraries, Build Your Own Digital Repository, and Getting Published: My Story of Writing and Publishing a Judge’s Biography.

Exhibit Hall breaks, dedicated meeting time for attendees and exhibitors, were held each morning and afternoon. In addition, sponsors provided product demonstrations during no-conflict times before and after scheduled programming.

Thank you to all the speakers, sponsors, exhibitors, and members who attended the 2017 Meeting. The Local Arrangements Committee enjoyed hosting and is extremely pleased that the feedback on it has been overwhelmingly positive. We look forward to #Diversify #SWALL2018 #Houston.

 

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SWALL Committee Reports, 2016-2017

Volume 41, Issue 1 (Fall 2017)

Life Membership/Memorials Committee

Jill Henderson, the former director of the Taylor County Law Library, has been nominated for SWALL Life Membership. Jill retired September 30, 2016 after 23 years as their law librarian.

According to our bylaws, a nominee for life membership must meet the following criteria:

  • Life members. The members entitled to vote may, by a vote of 2/3 of the majority, elect to life membership those who have been members of the corporation for at least five years, but who have retired from active library work. Someone who is currently working for a legal publisher or vendor is not “retired.”
  • Life members and student members shall not be assessed annual dues.
  • Suggestions should also be requested in the fall and winter issues of the Chapter newsletter.
  • The Committee submits the list of recommended life members to the Board of Directors prior to the annual business meeting.
  • The Board of Directors will make the final decision.

Jill has been a member of SWALL over 15 years. She was spotlighted in an August 2016 article from the Abilene Reporter-News. Among her many accomplishments, the article stated she made improvements at the inmate library at the Taylor County Jail, which has been closed since the last librarian there retired at the end of 2015.

Jill also helped people who “fell through the cracks,” meaning those who made too much money to qualify for services offered by Legal Aid of NorthWest Texas. She assisted by finding books and forms that were easier to read for those who were not attorneys.

The SWALL Life Membership/Memorials Committee is honored to submit before its members in general and the SWALL Board of Directors, the nomination of Jill Henderson as a Life Membership recipient.

 

Recruitment Committee (Cassie Dubay, Jeff Woodmansee)

The Recruitment Committee undertook a few projects this year.

  1. In July 2016, SWALL had a table at the AALL CONELL marketplace.
    • In partnership with Robert Clark on the public relations committee, the recruitment committee finalized a high-quality SWALL recruitment brochure. Unfortunately, our table did not generate much traffic, perhaps due to table location.
    • From the few who signed our interest form, we were able to raffle off a free one-year membership to SWALL. That person was Lei Zhang of the University of Texas.
    • The brochure is available on the website for future use (http://www.aallnet.org/chapter/swall/membership/SWALLbrochure.pdf).
  2. Our committee created a form and solicited program proposals for the program committee, for this annual meeting. We received 19 submissions.
  3. Our committee also solicited volunteers for the 2017-2018 committee placements. We received 26 submissions and placed volunteers by March 2017. We prioritized this responsibility this year as we felt it was important to place volunteers in advance of the annual meeting for two reasons:
    • Members on the fence of whether to attend the meeting might perhaps feel compelled to attend knowing their committee term would begin at the meeting; and
    • We wanted to set aside time at this year’s annual meeting for both outgoing and incoming committee volunteers to discuss responsibilities and potential future plans. Many AALL committees do this, and we wanted to echo that structure.
    • We urge all members to get involved. We are often able to place all volunteers on a committee of their choice and especially encourage newer members to volunteer to build leadership experience. If you’d still like to participate in SWALL more actively, it’s not too late, email Cassie DuBay.
  4. Our final task was to take on the committee charge of forming a mentorship program.
    • The committee solicited applications for mentors and mentees. Matched mentors/mentees would be invited to an information Meet & Greet Happy Hour at the SWALL annual meeting.
    • Unfortunately, we received applications for mentors only, 5 applications total.
    • We cancelled the happy hour, and adjusted the program. You can now look for Mentor ribbons on folks who we are calling “SWALL-Stars.” If you have a SWALL question or just looking for a new SWALL friend, we recommend starting with these SWALL-Stars!

 

Grants Committee

The Grants Committee awarded two grant awards of $500 for attendance at this year’s SWALL Annual Meeting.  We would like congratulate the following SWALL grant award recipients:

Aizul G. Ortega
Technical Services Supervisor
Travis County Law Library
Austin, Texas

Heather Holmes
Assistant Law Librarian
Harris County Law Library
1019 Congress Street
Houston, Texas

The SWALL grants committee will likely award at least one grant award for a SWALL member to attend this year’s AALL Annual Meeting  which will be held in Austin this year.  This information will likely be sent to the SWALL Listserv and posted to the SWALL website by the first week of May.

 

Public Relations Committee

Working with the Recruitment Committee, the Public Relations Committee created a SWALL recruitment brochure that was used at the 2016 Conference of New Law Librarians (CONELL) in Chicago.

 

If any other committee chairs from 2016-2017 have reports they would like added to this page, please email them to Alyson Drake (alyson.drake@ttu.edu), Chair of the SWALL Publications Committee.

 

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SWALL 2017 Business Meeting Report

Volume 41, Issue 1 (Fall 2017)

EBoard

SWALL’s 2016-2017 Executive Board

2017 SWALL ANNUAL MEETING
Albuquerque, NM – April 6-8, 2017
Business Meeting (April 7, 2017) Minutes

Committees read their reports:

ARCHIVES

The SWALL Archive is missing a few things. If you have served on a committee or the board in the last 5 years, please send all SWALL material you may have in your home or office to the Archives. If you have ever chaired a committee, please send me a copy of the annual report you wrote.  Emailing them to me is fine.

Next year we will celebrate SWALL’s 60th anniversary at the annual meeting in Houston and I would like to create a display celebrating our history. To that end, if you have photos or SWALL memorabilia from the past, please consider donating (or lending) them to the archives.

FINANCE

Katy Stein Badeaux, as treasurer, provided SWALL financials:

  • Numbers for the current meeting are still being calculated
  • However, we are happy to announce that SWALL made a profit of $5,800 from the previous joint SWALL/SEAALL meeting in 2016, in Dallas TX.

Statement of Cash Flows

 

GRANTS COMMITTEE

The grants committee awarded two grant awards of $500 for attendance at this year’s SWALL Annual Meeting.  We would like to congratulate the following SWALL grant award recipients:

Ai Aizul G. Ortega
Technical Services Supervisor
Travis County Law Library
Austin, Texas

Heather Holmes
Assistant Law Librarian
Harris County Law Library
1019 Congress Street
Houston, Texas

The SWALL grants committee will likely award at least one grant award for a SWALL member to attend this year’s AALL Annual Meeting which will be held in Austin this year.  This information will likely be sent to the SWALL Listserv and posted to the SWALL website by the first week of May.

LEGAL INFORMATION SERVICES TO THE PUBLIC

The LISP committee has elected to host a public services program later this year, not in conjunction with the annual meeting in Albuquerque.

LIFE MEMBERSHIP/MEMORIALS

Jill Henderson, the former director of the Taylor County Law Library, has been nominated for SWALL Life Membership. Jill retired September 30, 2016 after 23 years as their law librarian.

According to our bylaws, a nominee for life membership must meet the following criteria:

  • Life members. The members entitled to vote may, by a vote of 2/3 of the majority, elect to life membership those who have been members of the corporation for at least five years, but who have retired from active library work. Someone who is currently working for a legal publisher or vendor is not “retired.”
  • Life members and student members shall not be assessed annual dues.
  • Suggestions should also be requested in the fall and winter issues of the Chapter newsletter.
  • The Committee submits the list of recommended life members to the Board of Directors prior to the annual business meeting.
  • The Board of Directors will make the final decision.

Jill has been a member of SWALL over 15 years. She was spotlighted in an August 2016 article from the Abilene Reporter-News. Among her many accomplishments, the article stated she made improvements at the inmate library at the Taylor County Jail, which has been closed since the last librarian there retired at the end of 2015.

Jill also helped people who “fell through the cracks” meaning those who made too much money to qualify for services offered by Legal Aid of NorthWest Texas. She assisted by finding books and forms that were easier to read for those who were not attorneys.

The SWALL Life Membership/Memorials Committee is honored to submit before its members in general and the SWALL Board of Directors, the nomination of Jill Henderson as a Life Membership recipient.

LOCATION OF FUTURE MEETINGSLocation of Future Meetings

  • Joseph Lawson gave information for the 2018 meeting in Houston including hotel information and things to do in Houston.
  • A business card raffle was done giving a bottle of wine and a free stay at the host hotel.

PUBLIC RELATIONS

Working with the Recruitment Committee, the Public Relations Committee created a SWALL recruitment brochure that was used at the 2016 Conference of Newer Law Librarians (CONELL) in Chicago.

RECRUITMENT

The Recruitment Committee undertook a few projects this year.

  1. In July 2016, SWALL had a table at the AALL CONELL marketplace.
    1. In partnership with Robert Clark on the public relations committee, the recruitment committee finalized a high-quality SWALL recruitment brochure. Unfortunately, our table did not generate much traffic, perhaps due to table location.
    2. From the few who signed our interest form, we were able to raffle off a free one-year membership to SWALL. That person was Lei Zhang of the University of Texas.
    3. The brochure is available on the website for future use (http://www.aallnet.org/chapter/swall/membership/SWALLbrochure.pdf).
  2. Our committee created a form and solicited program proposals for the program committee, for this annual meeting. We received 19 submissions.
  3. Our committee also solicited volunteers for the 2017-2018 committee placements. We received 26 submissions and placed volunteers by March 2017. We prioritized this responsibility this year as we felt it was important to place volunteers in advance of the annual meeting for two reasons:
    1. Members on the fence of whether to attend the meeting might perhaps feel compelled to attend knowing their committee term would begin at the meeting; and
    2. We wanted to set aside time at this year’s annual meeting for both outgoing and incoming committee volunteers to discuss responsibilities and potential future plans. Many AALL committees do this, and we wanted to echo that structure.
    3. We urge all members to get involved. We are often able to place all volunteers on a committee of their choice and especially encourage newer members to volunteer to build leadership experience. If you’d still like to participate in SWALL more actively, it’s not too late, email Cassie DuBay.
  4. Our final task was to take on the committee charge of forming a mentorship program.
    1. The committee solicited applications for mentors and mentees. Matched mentors/mentees would be invited to an information Meet & Greet Happy Hour at the SWALL annual meeting.
    2. Unfortunately, we received applications for mentors only, 5 applications total.
    3. We cancelled the happy hour, and adjusted the program. You can now look for Mentor ribbons on folks who we are calling “SWALL-Stars.” If you have a SWALL question or just looking for a new SWALL friend, we recommend starting with these SWALL-Stars!

Other discussion:Business Meeting 2

  • Tentative 2019 meeting location – Little Rock, AR
  • New Executive Board was introduced
    • President – Joan Stringfellow (not in attendance)
    • Vice-President/President Elect – Jeff Woodmansee
    • Secretary – Cassie DuBay
    • Treasurer – Carla Cates
  • The Life Memberships/Memorials Committee honored Mortimer Schwartz (1922-2016), founding president of SWALL, with a moment of silence
  • Attendee, Mike Beaird, further honored Mortimer Schwartz with a few personal words

 

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SWALL Announcements, Publications, and Presentations

Volume 41, Issue 1 (Fall 2017)

Awards

Joseph Lawson, Harris County Law Library, was awarded AALL’s Emerging Leader Award.

Caren Luckie, Research Attorney at Jackson Walter LLP, was awarded the 2017 PLLIP Distinguished Librarian Award at the AALL Annual Meeting in Austin.

Karina Condra & Peter Kersten, Westminster Law Library, University of Denver Sturm College of Law, were awarded AALL’s Law Library Publications Award, Print Division, for Certificate in Legal Research Marketing Materials.

Harris County Law Library was awarded AALL’s Excellence in Marketing Award, Best Campaign, for Immigration Law and Internment Camps in Texas: Legal Perspectives on The Train to Crystal City by Jan Jarboe Russell

 

Announcements

The Dee J. Kelly Law Library at Texas A&M University School of Law is pleased to announce two new library faculty members have joined their team.

Malikah A. Hall joined their faculty on July 1 as a reference librarian. Prior to coming to TAMU Law, Malikah was the inaugural Diversity Fellow at Cornell University School of Law Library where she served as Research Services Librarian and Lecturer-in-Law.  Malikah earned her J.D. and Master of Library Science (summa cum laude) from North Carolina Central University in Durham, NC and holds a B.S. in Business and Administration from Chicago State University.

Then, on September 1, the Dee J. Kelly Law Library at Texas A&M University School of Law welcomed Aaron Retteen to the faculty. Aaron is the law library’s inaugural Digital Services & Repository Librarian. He recently made the move to Texas from the Sunshine State, after working as the Digital Scholarship Repository Specialist at Florida State University Libraries. Aaron earned his Juris Doctor from Florida State University College of Law, where he served as a senior member of the FSU Law Review and as the Articles & Notes Editor of the Journal of Land Use & Environmental Law. Aaron also holds a Master of Science in Information from Florida State University as well as Bachelor of Arts in Political Science from the University of Florida.

The Dee J. Kelly Law Library faculty and staff are thrilled Malikah and Aaron have joined their team. Please welcome them to SWALL. You can reach Malikah at mhall36@law.tamu.edu and Aaron at aretteen@law.tamu.edu.

 

 

Presentations and Publications

guerilla marketing.jpg

Joseph Lawson & Heather Holmes presenting their talk on Guerilla Marketing at SWALL’s Annual Conference before giving it at the Annual Conference in Austin.

The following SWALL members presented programs at AALL’s Annual Conference in Austin:

  • Erik Beck
  • Kenton Brice
  • Joni Cassidy
  • Susan Caterall
  • Cassie DuBay
  • Darin Fox
  • Heather Holmes
  • Joseph Lawson
  • Saskia Mehlhorn
  • Susan Phillips
  • LIsa Rush
  • Barbara Szalkowski
  • Sherri Thomas

The following SWALL members presented posters at AALL’s Annual Conference in Austin:

  • Jamie Baker
  • Stewart Caton
  • Alyson Drake
  • Bailey Eagin
  • Ed Hart
  • Heather Kushnerick

 

SWALL member Richard Guajardo, Head of Resource Discovery Systems at the University of Houston recently published the following articles:

  • Richard Guajardo, Kelsey Brett, & Frederick Young, “The Evolution of Discovery Systems in Academic Libraries: A Case Study at the University of Houston Libraries,” 29 J. Electronic Resources Librarianship (2017).
  • Susan Davis, Deberah England, Tina Feick, & Richard Guajardo, “ER Sleuths Are on the Case: Best Practices for E-Resource Acquisitions,” 72 The Serials Librarian 201 (2017).

He also made the following presentations:

  • “The Impact of Discovery Systems on Libraries’ Organizational Structure and Staffing” at Electronic Resources and Libraries Conference in Austin, Texas on April 3, 2017 (with Kelsey Brett & Frederick Young)
  • “Partnering with Vendors to Limit Compromised User Accounts” at NASIG Annual Conference in Indianapolis, IN on June 9, 2017 (with Don Hamparian & Peter Katz)

 

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SWALL Turns 60! Join Us for the Annual Meeting in Houston!

Volume 41, Issue 1 (Fall 2017)

SWALL 18 logo - take 2

Save the Date for SWALL’s Annual Conference–April 5-7, 2018.

We will hold SWALL’s 60th and HALL’s 40th Annual Meeting at the Magnolia Hotel in Houston, TX.  Room rates are $149 and you can book you room now at https://www.starwoodmeeting.com/events/start.action?id=1704216022&key=112060DD (copy and paste link into a web browser).

Special events are in the planning stages–watch this space for announcements closer to the event. See you soon!

Monica Ortale, Chair, Local Arrangements

SWALL 18

 

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Soliciting Programs for SWALL 2018

Volume 41, Issue 1 (Fall 2017)

On behalf of the Program Committee, I would like to invite members to submit a proposal for the SWALL 2018 Annual Meeting.​ We are looking for programs that cover a range of interesting and relevant topics and that appeal to the many types of law librarians and information professionals that make up our broad organization.

Program lengths are:

  • 45 minutes, with the option of longer “Deep Dives”
  • ​90 minutes (in two parts), and
  • Short​er “I​gnite Talks​”​ (20 slides x 20 seconds)​, all​ similar to what we’ve done in the past and based on existing AALL conference formats.

Please use the link below to submit your program proposal by Tuesday, October 31​.


CLICK HERE
to submit your​ annual meeting program​ proposal​s​​ via JotForm.

Members, contact Jeff B. Woodmansee, Program Committee Chair and V.P., with​ ​general programming or form submission questions at jbwoodmansee@ualr.edu or Local Arrangements Committee Liaison, Monica Ortale at mortale@stcl.edu, for particulars about the Houston location.

 

Submissions will be reviewed by the Program Committee and proposers of selected programs will be notified by Friday, November 17​.

 

SWALL 2018:

Diversify is a very special conference. The sponsoring chapters will be celebrat​ing​ some big anniversaries as SWALL turns 60 and HALL turns 40​!​

Additionally, as we meet in our association’s most diverse city, we turn our attention to celebrating the diversity of our membership, reaching out to new potential members, and diversifying our technological and other skills as we expand our knowledge base and learn how to better sell ourselves as information experts.

T​he​ conference will take place at the beautiful Magnolia Hotel in downtown Houston April 5-7, 2018. The ​official conference website is currently under developmen​t​ and will be ready for access soon with more information about the meeting and session locations.
We hope to see ​y’all in H-town  next spring!

Best regards,​
Jeff

 

​2017-18 ​SWALL Program Committee​:​

  • Jeff ​B. ​Woodmansee (Chair), UA Little Rock Bowen School of Law Library
  • Monica Ortale (Local Arrangements Committee Liaison), South Texas College of Law Houston Law Library
  • Michelle Rigual, University of New Mexico Law Library
  • Stacy Fowler, St Mary’s University Sarita Kenedy East Law Library
  • DeCarlous Spearman, Texas Southern University School of Law Library
  • Chris Dykes, University of Houston O’Quinn Law Librar​y​

 

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